Website Hosting

?Learn to use GitHub with GitHub Learning Lab

Video: GitHub: EU copyright crackdown could hurt open-source development

The most popular open-source development site in the world is GitHub. It’s used by tens of millions of developers to work on over 80 million projects.

It’s not just a site where people use Linus Torvalds’ Git open-source distributed version control system. It’s also an online home for collaboration, a sandbox for testing, a launchpad for deployment, and a platform for learning new skills. The GitHub Training Team has now released an app, GitHub Learning Lab, so you can join the programming party.

GitHub Learning Lab is not a tutorial or webcast. It’s an app that gives you a hands-on learning experience within GitHub. According to GitHub, “Our friendly bot will take you through a series of practical, fun labs that will give you the skills you need in no time–and share helpful feedback along the way.”

With GitHub Learning Lab, you’ll learn through issues opened by a bot in a GitHub repository. As you finish tasks, the bot will comment on your work and review your pull requests like a project collaborator would.

Read also: Google Fuchsia is not Linux: So, what is it and who will use it? | Perfectly legal ways you can still get Windows 7 cheap (or even free) | Google AI can pick out a single speaker in a crowd: Expect to see it in tons of products | Open source’s big German win: 300,000 users shift to Nextcloud for file sharing

If you have questions that come up while you complete a course, you can get answers in the GitHub Learning Lab Community Forum. This is a new way to get support from your fellow students and expert trainers, including members of the GitHub Training Team

The Lab is opening with five courses. These are:

  1. Introduction to GitHub: Get an introduction to the most common, collaborative workflow for developers around the world.
  2. Communicating using Markdown: Learn how to communicate on GitHub and beyond with Markdown’s simple syntax.
  3. GitHub Pages: Host a website or blog directly from your GitHub repository.
  4. Moving your project to GitHub: Get tips for migrating your code and contributors to GitHub.
  5. Managing merge conflict: Learn why merge conflicts happen and how to fix them.

GitHub will also release “Contributing to open source: Make your first open source contribution in a friendly mapping project,” soon.

Afterwards GitHub will add more classes to the app. It will also invite inviting new course authors and add more topics. You can add your own two cents on what should be offered on the Community Forum.

Related stories

Qualcomm Shares Tank Amid Layoffs

Qualcomm shares were down on Thursday after the semiconductor company began layoffs and is in the middle of a trade dispute between the U.S. and China over a planned acquisition.

Shares of the mobile chip manufacturer were down 4.6% in midday trading to $52.69 on Thursday.

Qualcomm plans to lay off around 1,500 employees in California as part of a broader push to reduce its expenses by $1 billion and improve its earnings, according to a Bloomberg News report on Wednesday, citing unnamed sources.

A Qualcomm spokesperson told Fortune in a statement that both full-time and temporary workers will be affected by the layoffs, without citing the specific number of full-time and contract workers that will be cut.

“We first evaluated non-headcount expense reductions, but we concluded that a workforce reduction is needed to support long-term growth and success, which will ultimately benefit all our stakeholders,” the Qualcomm spokesperson said of the layoffs in a statement.

Qualcomm (qcom) CEO Steve Mollenkopf revealed the company’s $1 billion cost-cutting initiative in January, but didn’t provide specific details. As Fortune’s Aaron Pressman explained, Qualcomm is under pressure to revive its shrinking, but crucial, core mobile business.

One of Qualcomm’s plans to revitalize its overall business includes its $47 billion bid for NXP Semiconductors, which makes computer chips for Internet-connected devices and autonomous vehicles. But that deal has faced a couple of roadblocks.

Qualcomm said on Thursday that it is withdrawing and refilling the acquisition notice related to NXP Semiconductors “at the request of the Ministry of Commerce in China.” By doing so, Qualcomm is pushing its acquisition deadline to July 25 from April 25, so that China could potentially approve the deal.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.

The semiconductor giant is essentially caught in the middle of the current trade war between China and the United States, and Chinese regulators told Bloomberg News on Thursday that it is seeking unspecified additional concessions from Qualcomm before it clears the deal.

Meanwhile, Qualcomm is still recovering from a proposed hostile takeover by chipmaker Broadcom that President Donald Trump squashed in March via an executive order that cited unspecified national security concerns. If Broadcom were to have bought Qualcomm for about $117 billion, the deal would have created an enormous mobile computer chip giant worth more than $200 billion.

Exclusive: Facebook to change user terms, limiting effect of EU privacy law

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – If a new European law restricting what companies can do with people’s online data went into effect tomorrow, almost 1.9 billion Facebook Inc users around the world would be protected by it. The online social network is making changes that ensure the number will be much smaller.

FILE PHOTO: Silhouettes of mobile users are seen next to a screen projection of Facebook logo in this picture illustration taken March 28, 2018. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File photo

Facebook members outside the United States and Canada, whether they know it or not, are currently governed by terms of service agreed with the company’s international headquarters in Ireland.

Next month, Facebook is planning to make that the case for only European users, meaning 1.5 billion members in Africa, Asia, Australia and Latin America will not fall under the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which takes effect on May 25.

The previously unreported move, which Facebook confirmed to Reuters on Tuesday, shows the world’s largest online social network is keen to reduce its exposure to GDPR, which allows European regulators to fine companies for collecting or using personal data without users’ consent.

That removes a huge potential liability for Facebook, as the new EU law allows for fines of up to 4 percent of global annual revenue for infractions, which in Facebook’s case could mean billions of dollars.

The change comes as Facebook is under scrutiny from regulators and lawmakers around the world since disclosing last month that the personal information of millions of users wrongly ended up in the hands of political consultancy Cambridge Analytica, setting off wider concerns about how it handles user data.

The change affects more than 70 percent of Facebook’s 2 billion-plus members. As of December, Facebook had 239 million users in the United States and Canada, 370 million in Europe and 1.52 billion users elsewhere.

Facebook, like many other U.S. technology companies, established an Irish subsidiary in 2008 and took advantage of the country’s low corporate tax rates, routing through it revenue from some advertisers outside North America. The unit is subject to regulations applied by the 28-nation European Union.

Facebook said the latest change does not have tax implications.

‘IN SPIRIT’

In a statement given to Reuters, Facebook played down the importance of the terms of service change, saying it plans to make the privacy controls and settings that Europe will get under GDPR available to the rest of the world.

“We apply the same privacy protections everywhere, regardless of whether your agreement is with Facebook Inc or Facebook Ireland,” the company said.

Earlier this month, Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg told Reuters in an interview that his company would apply the EU law globally “in spirit,” but stopped short of committing to it as the standard for the social network across the world.

In practice, the change means the 1.5 billion affected users will not be able to file complaints with Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner or in Irish courts. Instead they will be governed by more lenient U.S. privacy laws, said Michael Veale, a technology policy researcher at University College London.

Facebook will have more leeway in how it handles data about those users, Veale said. Certain types of data such as browsing history, for instance, are considered personal data under EU law but are not as protected in the United States, he said.

The company said its rationale for the change was related to the European Union’s mandated privacy notices, “because EU law requires specific language.” For example, the company said, the new EU law requires specific legal terminology about the legal basis for processing data which does not exist in U.S. law.

NO WARNING

Ireland was unaware of the change. One Irish official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said he did not know of any plans by Facebook to transfer responsibilities wholesale to the United States or to decrease Facebook’s presence in Ireland, where the social network is seeking to recruit more than 100 new staff.

Facebook released a revised terms of service in draft form two weeks ago, and they are scheduled to take effect next month.

Other multinational companies are also planning changes. LinkedIn, a unit of Microsoft Corp, tells users in its existing terms of service that if they are outside the United States, they have a contract with LinkedIn Ireland. New terms that take effect May 8 move non-Europeans to contracts with U.S.-based LinkedIn Corp.

LinkedIn said in a statement on Wednesday that all users are entitled to the same privacy protections. “We’ve simply streamlined the contract location to ensure all members understand the LinkedIn entity responsible for their personal data,” the company said.

Reporting by David Ingram in San Francisco; Additional reporting by Joseph Menn in San Francisco, Padraic Halpin and Conor Humphries in Dublin and Douglas Busvine in Frankfurt; Editing by Greg Mitchell and Bill Rigby

Tesla aiming to build 6,000 Model 3 cars per week by end-June: report

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Tesla Inc (TSLA.O) is aiming to ramp up production to 6,000 Model 3 cars per week by the end of June to reach its weekly goal of 5,000 and allow for a margin of error, automotive news website Electrek reported on Tuesday, citing a letter to employees from Chief Executive Elon Musk.

FILE PHOTO: A Tesla Model 3 is seen in a showroom in Los Angeles, California U.S. January 12, 2018. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson/File Photo

Underscoring Tesla’s need to roll out cars quickly to customers and collect needed revenue, the company will also begin working around the clock on the Model 3 sedan, adding another shift within general assembly, and both the body and paint shops, Electrek quoted Musk as saying.

Tesla did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment.

The news comes a day after Tesla temporarily suspended its Model 3 assembly line in what the company said was a planned pause, its second since February, to improve automation and address bottlenecks that have delayed production.

“We will be stopping for three to five days to do a comprehensive set of upgrades. This should set us up for Model 3 production of 3,000 to 4,000 per week next month,” Electrek quoted Musk as saying.

“Another set of upgrades starting in late May should be enough to unlock production capacity of 6,000 Model 3 vehicles per week by the end of June,” he added.

Investors are closely watching to see if Tesla is able to meet long-delayed targets and quickly ramp up the Model 3, on which the company’s future profitability rests. Tesla is pressured on a host of fronts after a fatality in one of its vehicles using its Autopilot system, a downgrade by Moody’s, and a public spat between Musk and safety regulators.

Tesla’s use of robots to assemble Model 3s has led to more complexity and delays, which Musk acknowledged last week in a tweet: “Excessive automation at Tesla was a mistake. To be precise, my mistake. Humans are underrated.”

“Tesla’s been trying to run full tilt,” said Chaim Siegel, an analyst at Elazar Advisors, before Musk’s letter was published. “He’s sleeping overnight on the production floor. I don’t think there is any way they’d purposely want to slow production. It tells me something’s not quite right.”

In the letter to employees cited by Electrek, Musk said Tesla had built over 2000 Model 3s per week for three weeks, with 2250 made last week.

Tesla had previously targeted 2,500 Model 3s a week by the end of the first quarter and 5,000 by the end of the second quarter.

Missed deadlines threaten the money-losing company’s credibility with the market and its ability to raise cash. Musk has said no new funds are needed this year, although many analysts dispute that.

Musk rallied employees in the letter, while warning departments or suppliers who missed the mark, saying they would need a “very good explanation” and a plan for fixing the problem presented directly to him.

Shares of Tesla, which ended 1.2 percent lower on Tuesday, rose 1.4 percent in after-hours trading.

Reporting by Alexandria Sage in San Francisco and Aishwarya Venugopal, Supantha Mukherjee and Sonam Rai in Bengaluru; Editing by Sai Sachin Ravikumar and Rosalba O’Brien

IRS gives taxpayers one-day extension after computer glitch

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Internal Revenue Service said it would give taxpayers an additional day to file their 2017 returns after computer problems prevented some people from filing or paying their taxes ahead of Tuesday’s midnight deadline.

A general view of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) building in Washington May 27, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

“Taxpayers do not need to do anything to receive this extra time,” the IRS said in a statement announcing the extension.

The agency said its processing systems were now back online.

Earlier, the agency said several systems were hit with the computer glitch, including one that handles some returns filed electronically and another that accepts online tax payments using a bank account.

The IRS said it believed the problem was a hardware issue and “not other factors.”

It was not clear how many taxpayers might have been affected, but the agency said it received 5 million tax returns on the final day of filing season last year.

“This is the busiest tax day of the year, and the IRS apologizes for the inconvenience this system issue caused for taxpayers,” acting IRS Commissioner David Kautter said in a statement.

The agency said taxpayers should continue to file their taxes as normal on Tuesday evening – whether electronically or on paper.

Taxpayers could also ask for six-month extensions, as President Donald Trump did. The White House said on Tuesday that Trump, because of the complexity of his tax returns, would file his by Oct. 15.

Reporting by Eric Beech; Editing by Diane Craft and Chris Reese

Google Showcases Virtual 3D Models of Breathtaking Endangered World Wonders

Google just debuted a new online web project in which people can see three-dimensional digital images of the world’s wonders, such as ancient Corinth’s ruined temples in Greece and the towering spires of the Ayutthaya Kingdom in Thailand.

The search giant and digital preservation nonprofit CyArk debuted Monday the Open Heritage project in which people can access some of CyArk’s 3D renderings of world wonders.

CyArk has been creating digital representations of historical monuments using laser scanning technology to capture accurate models of places like the Angkor Wat temple of Cambodia and Mount Rushmore in South Dakota.

The goal is to create high-quality imagery of historic relics that risk being destroyed over time due to a number of calamities like fierce storms, natural disasters, or warfare.

Chance Coughenour, a Google arts and culture program manager, said in a corporate blog post that Google helped convert CyArk’s imagery of historical wonders into a more consumer-friendly version that people can access using their personal computers, smartphones, or Google Daydream-compatible virtual reality headsets.

People will need the Google Chrome browser to scan the 25 different wonders currently available on the website if they lack a compatible VR headset. When accessing the project via a web browser, people can view the ancient temples and other relics from multiple angles, and zoom in so they can see the site’s innards like they are walking through them.

“With modern technology, we can capture these monuments in fuller detail than ever before, including the color and texture of surfaces and the geometry captured by laser scanners with millimeter precision in 3D,” Coughenour wrote. “These detailed scans can also be used to identify areas of damage and assist restoration efforts.”

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.

Outside researchers and academics can also apply to download CyArk’s source historical wonder data to be used for their own research, Coughenour wrote while citing Google’s cloud computing service as a way to help the process of obtaining the data.

SpaceX and NASA Delay Launch of Planet-Hunting Satellite TESS

SpaceX and NASA have delayed a major satellite launch.

The Elon Musk-led aerospace company said Monday that it had postponed a scheduled Monday launch because it must conduct additional testing related to the mission’s guidance, navigation, and control systems. SpaceX did not elaborate about testing to be done.

As part of the planned mission, SpaceX will launch NASA’s new Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, satellite that will be used to search for new planets. The spacecraft will monitor the brightness of over 200,000 stars in order to see if any get dimmer, which could indicate that they have orbiting planets, according to NASA.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.

NASA considers its TESS space mission to be a successor to the Kepler Space Telescope, which was launched in 2009.

Last week, SpaceX was reported to be raising $507 million in new funding in a round that would value it at $25 billion.

After Intense Criticism, RSA Tech Conference Adds More Women to Top Speaking Slots

When organizers of this week’s RSA computer security conference in San Francisco revealed their initial keynote speaker list a month ago, one thing stood out: Of the 20 scheduled speakers, only one was a woman.

Critics immediately seized on the skewed gender ratio at the conference, among the most prominent in the tech industry, as just another example of sexism in tech. After all, for years, top conference speaking slots along with jobs at prominent tech firms have been filled largely by men.

To make matters worse, that one woman scheduled to speak at RSA—Monica Lewinsky, who has remade herself as an anti cyber-bullying advocate after playing the key role in President Bill Clinton’s impeachment —isn’t a technologist.

Under fire, the RSA’s organizers went back to the drawing board and came up with a final keynote lineup for their five-day event, which kicks off April 16, that is somewhat more gender balanced. Of the 23 speakers, 7 are women. They include Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, prominent game developer Jane McGonigal, and Reshma Saujani, the founder of Girls Who Code, a group that focuses on teaching girls to create software.

“We’ve been working from the beginning to bring unique backgrounds and perspectives to the main stage, and are thrilled to deliver on that mission,” said Sandra Toms, vice president and curator of the RSA conference.

RSA’s speaker problem is hardly unique. In January, CES, another high-profile conference, faced similar complaints for the skewed gender makeup of its solo keynote speakers, all of whom were men.

When releasing its initial list of keynote speakers, RSA explained away the keynote criticism by saying that its speaker lineup was not yet final and that women accounted for a large number of women speakers outside of the keynotes (at last count, there are 141 women scheduled to speak during the conference in both keynotes and lower profile sessions). Organizers also laid some blame on the tech industry itself, saying that women fill only a fraction of its jobs, including in computer security.

Indeed, the tech industry’s gender makeup is heavily skewed. In so-called diversity reports detailing employee demographics, a number of major companies have confirmed that men vastly outnumber women at all levels.

For example, last year, Google said that women accounted for 31% of its workers, and just 21% of its tech workers. In leadership, women fill just one quarter of all the jobs.

At many tech conference, at least, the reality is even bleaker for women, whose only upside to their underrepresentation at the events is that they don’t have to wait in long lines like men do to use the restroom.

Renowned Gay Rights Lawyer Self-Immolates in Protest of Climate Policy

David Buckel, a lawyer who spent much of his life campaigning for gay rights, died after setting himself on fire in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park early Saturday. A pair of suicide notes from Buckel described the act as a “protest suicide” intended to “bring some attention to the need for expanded actions” on climate change policy and the use of fossil fuels.

According to eyewitnesses interviewed by the New York Daily News, Buckel’s burning body was near a main entrance to the park, highly visible to Saturday-morning joggers and cyclists. Witnesses described mistaking the burning body for a mannequin before emergency services arrived.

Buckel left two notes — one describing his suicide as a protest, and a second expanding on his motivations. In the second, a copy of which was sent to the Daily News, Buckel wrote that “my early death by fossil fuel reflects what we are doing to ourselves,” suggesting he had used gasoline or a similar fuel in his suicide.

“Polution ravages our planet, oozing inhabitability via air, soil, water and weather,” he wrote. “Our present grows more desperate, our future needs more than what we’ve been doing.”

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.

Recent years, and even recent days, have seen alarming signs that climate change is progressing even faster than scientists had previously projected. Climate scientists this week announced findings that an Atlantic Ocean current that helps equalize global temperatures has slowed drastically, in part because of human-caused climate change, potentially leading to disastrous climate shifts in Europe.

Meanwhile, U.S. political leadership has rolled back efforts to limit the carbon emissions that cause climate change. The Trump administration announced in June of last year that the U.S. would withdraw from the Paris climate accords. Earlier this month, Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency — led by the embattled, free-spending Scott Pruitt — announced that it would roll back fuel economy standards set under President Barack Obama.

Buckel, 60, had played a prominent role in the fight for gay rights in America for decades. He was the lead attorney in a lawsuit involving Brandon Teena, a transgender murder victim who was portrayed by Hilary Swank the film Boys Don’t Cry, as the Daily News reported.

He had led the push for gay marriage rights at Lambda Legal, a national organization devoted to LGBT issues. In a statement Saturday, Lambda executive Camilla Taylor described Buckel as a “brilliant legal visionary,” particularly praising his work on the cases Nabozny v. Podlesny, which in 1996 established that schools had a responsibility to protect gay students from harassment; and Lewis v. Harris, which helped expand gay marriage rights in the U.S.

In his suicide notes, Buckel compared his death to that of Tibetan monks who have committed suicide in a similar manner to protest Chinese rule over the region.

Apple Warns Employees to Stop Leaking Information to Media

Apple Inc. warned employees to stop leaking internal information on future plans and raised the specter of potential legal action and criminal charges, one of the most-aggressive moves by the world’s largest technology company to control information about its activities.

The Cupertino, California-based company said in a lengthy memo posted to its internal blog that it “caught 29 leakers,” last year and noted that 12 of those were arrested. “These people not only lose their jobs, they can face extreme difficulty finding employment elsewhere,” Apple added. The company declined to comment on Friday.

Apple outlined situations in which information was leaked to the media, including a meeting earlier this year where Apple’s software engineering head Craig Federighi told employees that some planned iPhone software features would be delayed. Apple also cited a yet-to-be-released software package that revealed details about the unreleased iPhone X and new Apple Watch.

Leaked information about a new product can negatively impact sales of current models, give rivals more time to begin on a competitive response, and lead to fewer sales when the new product launches, according to the memo. “We want the chance to tell our customers why the product is great, and not have that done poorly by someone else,” Greg Joswiak, an Apple product marketing executive, said in the memo.

The crackdown is part of broader and long-running attempts by Silicon Valley technology companies to track and limit what information their employees share publicly. Firms like Google and Facebook Inc. are pretty open with staff about their plans, but keep close tabs on their outside communications and sometime fire people when they find leaks.

Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg last week talked about her disappointment with leakers. In 2016, Google fired an employee after the person shared internal posts criticizing an executive. The employee filed a lawsuit claiming their speech was protected under California law.

In messages to staff, tech companies sometimes conflate conversations employees are allowed to have, such as complaining about working conditions, with sharing trade secrets, said Chris Baker, an attorney with Baker Curtis and Schwartz, PC, who represents the fired Googler. “The overall broad definition of confidential information makes it so employees don’t say anything, even about issues they’re allowed to talk about,” he said. “That’s problematic.”

Apple is notoriously secretive about its product development. In 2012, Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook pledged to double down on keeping the company’s work under wraps. Despite that, the media has continued to report news on the firm to satisfy demand for information on a company that’s become a crucial part of investment portfolios, many of which support public retirement funds for teachers and other essential workers.

In 2017, Apple held a confidential meeting with employees in another bid to stop leaks. Since then, publications, including Bloomberg News, published details about the iPhone X, a new Apple TV video-streaming box, a new Apple Watch with LTE, the company’s upcoming augmented-reality headset, new iPad models, software enhancements, and details about the upcoming iPhones and AirPods headphones.

Here’s the memo:

Last month, Apple caught and fired the employee responsible for leaking details from an internal, confidential meeting about Apple’s software roadmap. Hundreds of software engineers were in attendance, and thousands more within the organization received details of its proceedings. One person betrayed their trust.

The employee who leaked the meeting to a reporter later told Apple investigators that he did it because he thought he wouldn’t be discovered. But people who leak — whether they’re Apple employees, contractors or suppliers — do get caught and they’re getting caught faster than ever.

In many cases, leakers don’t set out to leak. Instead, people who work for Apple are often targeted by press, analysts and bloggers who befriend them on professional and social networks like LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook and begin to pry for information. While it may seem flattering to be approached, it’s important to remember that you’re getting played. The success of these outsiders is measured by obtaining Apple’s secrets from you and making them public. A scoop about an unreleased Apple product can generate massive traffic for a publication and financially benefit the blogger or reporter who broke it. But the Apple employee who leaks has everything to lose.

The impact of a leak goes far beyond the people who work on a project.

Leaking Apple’s work undermines everyone at Apple and the years they’ve invested in creating Apple products. “Thousands of people work tirelessly for months to deliver each major software release,” says UIKit lead Josh Shaffer, whose team’s work was part of the iOS 11 leak last fall. “Seeing it leak is devastating for all of us.”

The impact of a leak goes beyond the people who work on a particular project — it’s felt throughout the company. Leaked information about a new product can negatively impact sales of the current model; give rival companies more time to begin on a competitive response; and lead to fewer sales of that new product when it arrives. “We want the chance to tell our customers why the product is great, and not have that done poorly by someone else,” says Greg Joswiak of Product Marketing.

Investments by Apple have had an enormous impact on the company’s ability to identify and catch leakers. Just before last September’s special event, an employee leaked a link to the gold master of iOS 11 to the press, again believing he wouldn’t be caught. The unreleased OS detailed soon-to-be-announced software and hardware including iPhone X. Within days, the leaker was identified through an internal investigation and fired. Global Security’s digital forensics also helped catch several employees who were feeding confidential details about new products including iPhone X, iPad Pro and AirPods to a blogger at 9to5Mac.

Leakers in the supply chain are getting caught, too. Global Security has worked hand-in-hand with suppliers to prevent theft of Apple’s intellectual property as well as to identify individuals who try to exceed their access. They’ve also partnered with suppliers to identify vulnerabilities — both physical and technological — and ensure their security levels meet or exceed Apple’s expectations. These programs have nearly eliminated the theft of prototypes and products from factories, caught leakers and prevented many others from leaking in the first place.

Leakers do not simply lose their jobs at Apple. In some cases, they face jail time and massive fines for network intrusion and theft of trade secrets both classified as federal crimes. In 2017, Apple caught 29 leakers. 12 of those were arrested. Among those were Apple employees, contractors and some partners in Apple’s supply chain. These people not only lose their jobs, they can face extreme difficulty finding employment elsewhere. “The potential criminal consequences of leaking are real,” says Tom Moyer of Global Security, “and that can become part of your personal and professional identity forever.”

While they carry serious consequences, leaks are completely avoidable. They are the result of a decision by someone who may not have considered the impact of their actions. “Everyone comes to Apple to do the best work of their lives — work that matters and contributes to what all 135,000 people in this company are doing together,” says Joswiak. “The best way to honor those contributions is by not leaking.”

Unique Premium WP Themes Free
Ritzywordpressthemes.com is a site dedicated to procure for you free Wordpress themes and/or uniquely designed premium Wordpress themes for your blogs. Though exclusively designed themes normally have a cost, for most cases, we are able to find a company willing to sponsor the theme; hence you will have it for free. Contact us for more info.
Cloud Computing Tutorials